Every lump and bump is not cancer! So I know its
easier said than done but it's true. Don't worry. .
.not yet.
The 80 - 20 rule works in your favor!
Check yourself monthly and get checked annually.

Breast Cancer: Lower Your Risk
Breast Cancer: Treatment
Why is it important to find breast cancer early?
Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in the US. It is also a leading
cause of death. With regular checks of the breast, most cancers can be found at an
early stage, before they spread to other parts of the body. This is very important
because when breast cancer is found early, before it spreads, it can be cured.
Some women have a higher risk than others, but any woman can get breast cancer.
All women should be alert and check their breasts regularly.


What are the best ways to detect breast cancer early?
You can do 3 things:
  • Do monthly breast self-exams of your breasts.
  • Have regular medical checkups that include a check of your breasts by your
    physician, nurse practitioner or physician assistant.
  • Have regular mammograms, according to her (or his) recommendations. Some
    women who have a higher risk of breast cancer may also need to be screened
    with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).


Breast self-examination
Breast self-exams should be done once a month. If you still menstruate, do it a few
days after your period. If you no longer menstruate, do it about the same time each
month.
  • Lie down and put your left arm under your head. This spreads the breast
    tissue more evenly on your chest. Use your right hand to examine your left
    breast. With your 3 middle fingers flat, move gently in a small circular motion
    over the entire area of the breast, checking for any lump, hard knot, or
    thickening. Use different levels of pressure--light, medium, and firm--to feel
    breast tissue at different levels in your breast. Then put your right arm under
    your head. Use your left hand to examine your right breast in the same way
    you checked your left breast. Be sure to check the whole breast, from your
    collar bone above your breast and down until you feel only ribs below your
    breast.

  • Look at your breasts while standing in front of a mirror with your hands
    pressing firmly down on your hips. Look for lumps, new differences in size and
    shape, and swelling or dimpling of the skin.

  • While standing or sitting, slightly raise one arm, then the other, so you can
    check your underarm area for lumps.

  • Squeeze the nipple of each breast gently between your thumb and index
    finger. Report any discharge or fluid to your physician, nurse practitioner or
    physician assistant right away.

If you want to check to see if you are doing the exam the right way, ask your
physician, nurse practitioner or physician assistant to show you how to do it.

Exams by your physician, nurse practitioner or physician assistant
Have a breast exam by your physician, nurse practitioner or physician assistant at
least every 3 years if you are 20 to 39 years old and every year after the age of 40.
She can identify lumps the size of a pea, smaller than a woman can typically find on
her own. In addition, a trained examiner can find lumps that are located in areas
that are hard for a mammogram to detect, such as near the chest wall.
If you notice a lump in your breast, have it examined by your physician, nurse
practitioner or physician assistant right away.

Mammograms
A mammogram is a special X-ray of the breast. It can show abnormalities that are
too small to feel, so it is an excellent way to screen women for early breast cancer.
However, although mammograms show most breast cancers, they do not find all
cancers. Because of this, breast self-exams and physical exams by your physician,
nurse practitioner or physician assistant are very important. These exams may find
cancers that do not show on the mammogram and cancers that develop between
mammograms.

















If you have a high risk for breast cancer and are 30 years old or older, ask your
physician, nurse practitioner or physician assistant how often you should have a
mammogram. She may recommend MRI screening as well.

All women age 50 to 70 should have a mammogram every 1 to 2 years, depending
on their personal and family history. Comparing mammograms from year to year
helps detect early cancer. If you are over 70, ask your physician, nurse practitioner
or physician assistant how often you should have a mammogram.

If you are told that your mammogram is abnormal or that there are changes from
your last mammogram, do not panic. It may be just normal tissue, but you will need
to have it checked further. This may be done with more mammogram images, MRI,
ultrasound, or a needle biopsy, depending on the opinion of the radiologist.

Remember, early detection is your best defense against cancer.
You need Java to see this applet.
GENERAL SURGEON, CERTIFIED BY THE AMERICAN BOARD OF SURGERY
3019 FARROW ROAD, COLUMBIA, SC 29203
PHONE (803) 779-3222  FAX (803) 779-3223